2012 eNews

Ottawa, June 20, 2012 — Equine Canada announced today that Para-Equestrian athletes Lauren Barwick, Eleonore Elstone, Ashley Gowanlock, and Jody Schloss have been nominated to the Canadian Paralympic Committee to represent Canada at the 2012 Paralympic Games, August 29–September 9 in London, England.

Barwick, Elstone, and Gowanlock are each returning Paralympians, while Schloss will be making her Paralympic debut in London, providing a combination of experience and new talent to the team.
 
The Canadian Para-Equestrian team riders have had remarkable success over the past 12 months, achieving podium performances at international events in the United Kingdom, Portugal, Belgium, Germany and the United States, which has put the team in fourth place in the world heading into the Games.

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Canadian Food Inspection Agency  Animal Products
Animal Health and Production Division

Vesicular Stomatitis

What is it?
Vesicular stomatitis (VS) is a viral disease affecting horses, ruminants such as cattle, sheep and members of the deer and llama families, and swine. While VS causes discomfort to affected animals, and may result in loss of markets for live animals, meat and animal genetics, it is most significant because it closely resembles foot and mouth disease (FMD). Foot and mouth disease affects ruminants and swine, and is a devastating disease for producers.

How is it transmitted?
Animals are infected with the virus by eating or coming into contact with substances contaminated with saliva or fluid from the lesions of infected animals. Spread in dairy herds may also occur as a result of milking procedures. In some regions insects play a significant role in the spread of the disease.
The disease may also be transmitted to humans who come into contact with infected animals. It causes influenza-like symptoms.

What are the signs of VS?
Vesicular stomatitis causes a mild fever, and the formation of blister-like lesions on the inside of the mouth, and on the lips, nose, hooves and udder. The blisters break, leaving raw, sore areas. Affected animals often salivate profusely, and are unwilling to eat or drink. Some animals, particularly swine, may become lame. Milking cows show a marked decrease in milk production. The incubation period (the time between infection with the virus and clinical signs) may range from two to eight days, and animals generally recover completely in three to four days.

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The following articles were previously published in our eNews. Don't miss out - click here to sign up for our free monthly eNews. Please check back often as we are constantly adding resource articles. More resource articles can be found by searching our past proceedings manuals from our annual Horse Breeders and Owners Conference. You can also use the "Search" tab above to search the entire site for the information you are looking for.

 

Care

5 Factors for Finding the Finest Farrier

Care of the Aging Horse

Common Horse Emergencies

Essential Supplies for your First Horse

Parasite Control for Today's Horse

Your Horse's Baseline

 

Buying and Selling

Going Once, Going Twice... SOLD

Selling a Horse with a Halter 

 

Feeding and Nutrition

Finances and Forages

Don't Freak-Out about Fructans

Feeding When Hay is in Short Supply

Hay Quality and Selection

 

History

The Domestication of the Horse (part 1)

The Domestication of the Horse (part 2)

 

Seasonal Tips

But isn't He Cold?

Get out the Rubber Boots - Spring is Coming

Spring Pasture Management

Winter Feeding: Failing to Prepare can have Disasterous Effects

Winter is Just Around the Corner

Winter Management Considerations

Winter Water

 

Trailering and Horse Transportation

Minimizing Stress During Horse Transportation

Spring Trailer Preparation

 

Training etc...

5 Minutes with Jill Henselwood = 5 Key Ingredients to Success

5 Quality Minutes with your Horse part 1

5 Quality Minutes with your Horse part 2

40 Great Tips for Trail Riders

A Regard for Round-Penning

Chain of Command: Use VS. Abuse Clarified by the Experts

Conditioning in Cold Weather

Creating Success and Overcoming Fear part 1

Creating Success and Overcoming Feart part 2

Getting Back in the Saddle

Go With the Flow

Positive Reinforcement Training Methods for Horses

Stolen Horse Nightmare

What is Feel and Rhythm?

 

 

From April 18-22, HIAA and ASI were involved with Aggie Days in Calgary teaching urban school students all about horses with our popular equine welfare and care education5photo centre. From Wednesday to Friday, around 10 000 students were on the grounds being educated about agriculture. They were accompanied by 3500 teachers and 4000 volunteers. Thanks to Linda Jesse and Kathy Marston for teaching these students with us.

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2017

Upcoming Events

 Upcoming Events
Spruce Meadows 'National'

June 7-11, 2017

 

 

 

 

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HIAA E-News

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