2006 Horse Breeders & Owners Conference

Mike Scott, DVM, MVSc
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Surgeons
Moore & Company Veterinary Services Ltd.
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
www.mooreandco.com

Introduction
I am a veterinarian specializing in equine surgery, and I work at Moore & Company Veterinary Services in Calgary, Alberta. I graduated from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) in Saskatoon in 1993. Following graduation, I completed a 1 year internship in Large Animal Medicine & Surgery at the Ontario Veterinary College. I was then fortunate to be admitted to a Large Animal Surgery Residency program at the WCVM. I completed my residency training in 1998, and became board certified by the American College of Veterinary Surgeons in 1999. Today most of my work involves equine surgery, lameness diagnosis, and diagnostic imaging. It is a pleasure and an honor to give this presentation at the Horse Industry Association of Alberta Horse Breeders and Owners Conference.

Read more...

FITNESS FOR THE RIDER
Body, Mind, Spirit

Sally Bishop
BA Environmental Science, Principia College
ACE-certified personal trainer, former NCAA college athlete and team captain, professional trick rider

Regardless of your particular equine discipline, we all regard our horses as athletes, but do you hold yourself to the same regime of conditioning? Or do you regard saddle-time as enough physical activity? In today’s society, fitness is revered as a very important part of general aesthetics, or looking good. But as riders, its importance goes above and beyond this.

Read more...

Ken Carson
General Manager, Valor Farm

The biggest change in standing stallions in the regional markets during the last 15 years is the difficulty of acquiring them. The demand for top quality stallions worldwide has made it hard to justify what they cost. Additionally, the shake-up in the stallion acquisition food chain in Kentucky has affected acquiring stallions at every level and every region.

Read more...

Stephen Dobson
President, D.H. Resorts, Inc.

Agri-tourism is relatively new terminology within the business of tourism. Although many tourism businesses have been using this concept for years, it is only recently that agriculture and tourism agencies have realized the benefit and potential of combining their strengths. Agri-tourism is defined as any business conducted by a farmer for the enjoyment or education of the public, to promote the products of the farm and to generate additional farm income.

Read more...

Dave Elliott

The anatomy of a horses head plays an important role in the form, function and design of a bit. By understanding where the bit applies pressure in or on the horse’s head we can better judge the response we want to achieve. If we are creating excessive physical pressure, keep in mind that this gives the horse the opportunity to resist and he will win. When we use our hands to feel the horse he will respond mentally, and his mind controls all his physical maneuvers. By using pressure points, i.e. lips, tongue, palate, bars, curb, pole and nose, we can understand how a bit effects the horse. When we figure out which pressure point or combination of pressure points the horse best responds to, then the bit can be selected. I believe the mouthpiece is for the horse and the cheekpieces are for the rider.

Read more...

Glory Ann Kurtz
Executive Editor, Quarter Horse News

When they go to a sale, horse buyers love yearlings! They’re fit and gorgeous, but best of all, they’re untried. It’s the gamble that seems to turn them on.

But buying young prospects is probably the biggest gamble in the horse business. However, a lot of buyers think they can beat the system. Especially those with a pocket full of money that are savvy about performance horse pedigrees. They are just positive that a High Brow Cat colt out of a Smart Little Lena mare is going to be a winner and will more than likely pad their bank account and put them in the headlines in years to come. That cross is probably the hottest commodity going.

Read more...

Norman K. Luba
President, Kentucky Quarter Horse Association

The Quarter Horse is the world’s most popular breed, and the American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA) registers more than 150,000 foals annually. Because of their versatility, Quarter Horses owned in Kentucky are dispersed among many more counties and towns than any other breed. The Commonwealth, best known for its Thoroughbred industry, has more verified Quarter Horses (36,198 in 2004) than Thoroughbreds. The Quarter Horse industry is a vital element in Kentucky’s collective equine industry.1 This presentation will use as a primary example the Kentucky Quarter Horse Breeder’s Incentive Program developed in 2005, as well as review other incentive programs, racing and non-racing, that might be relevant to a better understanding of optimizing the potential success of such programs. Regardless of your breed preference, incentive programs can be an important tool in promotion of your breed. This presentation will identify key philosophies, considerations, limitations and realities of developing an incentive program that meets your objectives.

Read more...

Cynthia A. McCall, PhD
Professor and Extension Horse Specialist
Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama

Introduction
Many horse owners are content owning a pleasure horse which can carry them at a leisurely pace along a trail. Others want a horse that can perform successfully in competitive events. For a horse to be successful in either job it must be able to learn specific tasks. Most of these tasks are based on natural physiological responses of the horse, but they are performed with an intensity and duration that the horse normally would not use on its own. For example, successful polo ponies must discriminate and follow a fast-moving ball while running at top speed, and making hard turns and stops. All tasks have components of natural behaviors which have been developed to an extreme degree. Teaching horses specific tasks is a fairly simple procedure, but it is a procedure which is often mishandled in spite of good intentions.

Read more...

Dr. Scott McClure

Dr. Scott McClure received his veterinary degree from Iowa State University in 1990. He became certified by the American College of Veterinary Surgeons in 1995 and received his PhD from Texas A&M in 1996. Dr. McClure was in private practice in Oklahoma and on faculty at Purdue University before returning to Iowa State University . He is currently an Assistant Professor in Veterinary Clinical Sciences doing equine surgery and lameness.

 

Please click here to download this article.

Current Ideas of Causes and Management
A.M. Merritt, DVM, MS
Professor Emeritus, University of Florida


Some Essentials of Equine Gastric Anatomy
and Function Relative to EGUS

Anatomy
In contrast to humans, where the whole stomach is lined by a glandular mucosa (lining) that secretes many things, including acid, the top half of the equine stomach is lined with a non-glandular (often called “squamous”) mucosa, which is similar in structure to that which lines the esophagus in all species (Fig. 1). The demarcation line between the glandular and non-glandular mucosa is referred to as the margo plicatus. Normally, this line is very sharp, but it can become quite deformed by ulceration of the non-glandular mucosa in that region.

Read more...

Where is the Scientific Validation?
Dr. Ginger A. Rich
Rich Equine Nutritional Consulting, LLC
Eads, TN

In the past 10-12 years our reading radar began picking up several new words in horse magazines and on feed store shelves — nutraceutical and ergogenic aid. These terms are used to describe a group of dietary supplements with bewildering claims and uses. The scope of this paper will include only supplements/agents that can be administered orally and have a nutritional function.

Read more...

Lynne Sandmeyer DVM, DVSc, DACVO
Associate Professor Ophthalmology
University of Saskatchewan

Read more...

D. Phillip Sponenberg, DVM, PhD
Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine
Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA

An increasing number of defects in horses are known to have genetic origins, and managing these can be very important in order to produce sound, healthy horses. Specific strategies vary with the defect, the breed, and the mode of inheritance. A few examples can help.

Read more...

THE CHANGES AND CHALLENGES AHEAD

Juli S. Thorson
President, Juli S. Thorson, Inc.
Contributing editor, Western Horseman magazine

As breeders, buyers and sellers of horses, you have a vested interest in the future of the horse market — not just in the short term, but in the longer term as well. And because of that vested interest, you’ve most likely noticed some worrisome signs that “the future ain’t what it used to be.” Participation’s down in many of the areas we think of as key indicators of market health, ranging from stallion bookings to show entries to sale averages. Naturally, the involved horseman wants to know why this is so, the better to plan for his own part in the horse market’s future.

Read more...

THE CHANGES AND CHALLENGES AHEAD

Juli S. Thorson
President, Juli S. Thorson, Inc.
Contributing editor, Western Horseman magazine

As breeders, buyers and sellers of horses, you have a vested interest in the future of the horse market — not just in the short term, but in the longer term as well. And because of that vested interest, you’ve most likely noticed some worrisome signs that “the future ain’t what it used to be.” Participation’s down in many of the areas we think of as key indicators of market health, ranging from stallion bookings to show entries to sale averages. Naturally, the involved horseman wants to know why this is so, the better to plan for his own part in the horse market’s future.

Read more...

Dianne Lindig Tobin

Part I: Introduction
My passion is riding and horsemanship. My partner, Peter, likes riding, but he is passionate about golf. He finds it amusing that I can spontaneously launch into a one or two hour conversation about training or behavior with only the slightest spark of encouragement from a fellow aficionado. However, he takes his golf habit very seriously, as reflected by the many hours he spends exploring and analyzing every detail and nuance of his chosen sport. Sometimes, at the end of a day when we’ve each engaged in our chosen pursuits, we’ll come together to compare notes. When I ask him, “How was your day?”, he sometimes replies with disappointment, “I had a really bad day on the course. How about you?” My honest reply is almost always the same, “I can’t really have a bad day when I’m riding.”

Read more...

Lori K. Warren, PhD, PAS
Department of Animal Sciences,
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida

Introduction
Adding fat to the horse’s diet has become increasingly popular in recent years. Whether it’s top-dressing corn oil, switching to a fat-added grain mix, or the convenience of “dry” fat in blended fat supplements, the diets of many horses are being affected by the fat-feeding craze.

Read more...

D. Phillip Sponenberg, DVM, PhD.
Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine
Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA

Horse color genetics is a complicated subject, and it is impossible to deny that the complexities can make it difficult to understand. By breaking down the subject into smaller pieces it is possible to begin to understand how the interactions of different factors result in the vast array of color in horses. A first step is to separate out white spots or hairs, and only concentrate on color. Following an appreciation of how the colors arise it is possible to add the white, and thereby understand the final combinations.

Read more...

Lori K. Warren, PhD, PAS
Department of Animal Sciences, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida

Introduction
Over the past 30 years, research has provided tremendous advances in feeding horses. Feed companies have taken this research knowledge and “put it in the bag” to help your horses grow up to their genetic potential, perform well, and live longer. Unfortunately, it has also generated a great deal of confusion about which feeds to select for your horses. As little as 10 years ago, a trip to the feed store involved a simple choice between oats or sweet feed. Today, you have hundreds of feed products to choose from, and that’s not counting the thousands of supplements that are also crowding the shelves!

Read more...

Gallery Preview

2017

Upcoming Events

 Upcoming Events
Spruce Meadows 'National'

June 7-11, 2017

 

 

 

 

Industry Directory

HIAA E-News

Please Click Here to view our Industry Directory with links to equine sport groups, breed groups, facilities, calendars and publications in Alberta.

Contact

Contact Us
Office Address:

97 East Lake Ramp NE
Airdrie, AB
T4A 0C3
Phone: 403-420-5949
Fax: 403-948-2069